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  • [IIT-H (DISANET)] Straining eyes to immeasurable motions of tectonic plates – action plans were discussed for active faulting surveys and estimation of slip rates and recurrence intervals of damaging past earthquakes by the results of Global Positioning System (GPS) observation

Topics & Events

November 13, 2010

[IIT-H (DISANET)] Straining eyes to immeasurable motions of tectonic plates – action plans were discussed for active faulting surveys and estimation of slip rates and recurrence intervals of damaging past earthquakes by the results of Global Positioning System (GPS) observation

Photo(From left) Prof. Kato, Prof. Okumura, (Left in front) Prof. Dikshit, and (Right in front) Dr. Malik at IITK

Prof. KATO Teruyuki, Earthquake Research Institute, the University of Tokyo, and Prof. OKUMURA Koji, Department of Geography, Faculty of Letters, Hiroshima University, who are Japanese Researchers for GPS (Group 1 sub-group) of DISANET, visited to India from 1 to 11 November in order to discuss about detailed action plans for GPS research with Prof. Onkar Dikshit, Department of Civil Engineer, IIT Kanpur (IITK) and Dr. Javed N. Malik, Associate Professor, IITK, who are Indian researchers for GPS (Group 1 sub-group) of DISANET. GPS (Group 1 sub-group) of DISANET aims at studying crustal deformation using GPS and active faults. During this visit, the Indian and Japanese research team intensively discussed about the detailed specifications of equipment as well as action plans for the forthcoming joint research.


Preparation for investigation of ground conditions at Himalayan Front

PhotoThe Himalayan front
Photo(From left) Prof. Okumura, Prof. Kato, and Dr. Malik

The Himalayan ranges in northern India are rising further due to the Indian plate pushing against the Eurasian plates which cause periodic mountain building phases. Such phases continue so that earthquakes often occur at the Himalayan front. DISANET, starting from July 2010 as a 5 year joint research and development project between India and Japan, aims at establishing infrastructure for continuous data collection on earthquake and weather with global information network by applying it to India and Japan as example cases and to develop technical bases for rescue and support for restoration and for disaster recovery support. To estimate slip rates and recurrence intervals of damaging past earthquakes by the results GPS and to examine active faults is one of the important activities of DISANET to analyze the overall trend of earthquake in India.


PhotoReviewing existing equipment at IITK. (Left) Dr. Malik and Prof. Okumura (Right), Prof. Dikshit and Prof. Kato,

During the visit this time, both Indian and Japanese researchers elaborate the detailed action plan for studying crustal deformation using GPS and active faults. The discussion included reviewing detailed specifications of equipment, approaches to develop long lists of sites for trench excavations based on Dr. Malik’s resent research work, action plan for the joint research, reviewing issues for the joint research implementation, and so on.

IITK research team and Prof. Okumura also went for a field trip from Uttar Pradesh where IITK is located to Punjab via Himachal Pradesh by road to assess potential sites for GPS establishment points and trench excavations. They thoroughly observed geological characteristics of each site and analyzed the topographic distortions, geologic strata, and archaeological evidences in order to infer a certain pattern of active faults at the Himalayan front, which continues since several hundred years ago, by using various human intellects. IITK research students also joined to the team as assistants and enjoyed learning directly from well-known professors in India and Japan at the field.

Prof. Onkar Dikshit, and Dr. Javed N. Malik will visit to Japan in December based on the action plan developed, and will meet with more researchers in Japan working on earthquake researches, then review the long list of sites further by using other secondary references to implement the joint study of crustal deformation using GPS and active faults at the Himalayan front.

Photo(Left) The research team assessing the road map and archeological evidences of the site. (Second left) Dr. Malik showing his past research works to research students and Prof. Okumura at the site of the trench excavation. (Second right) Intensive discussions in front of a topographic distortion. (Right) The research team climbing up a local resident in the Himalayan front in order to observe geological characteristics of the area.

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